SUPERSONIC SAUCER

25:04:17

The second part of this Film Night double feature was LUNCH HOUR (1961), the review for it will be posted as soon as possible.

supersonic saucer

This could be difficult. A lot of water has passed under the bridge since watching these two films. Things have happened: An unexpected stay in hospital for one. Nevertheless, in an attempt to stay true to the pledge of recording every film we’ve watched in the Film Night 2017 series, here goes.

This was a double bill of two short features, starting with Supersonic Saucer (1956). It was good to see the Children’s Film Foundation logo with the massive capital letters ‘CFF’ against the backdrop of pigeons taking flight from Trafalgar Square. It brought back memories of the Essoldo at Sheffield Lane Top. I used to go there occasionally on a Saturday afternoon with a few schoolmates on the bus. It had torn seats, fag burns, and two Art Deco statues that cast a watchful eye over the sweet throwing and dubious adolescent goings on. It closed as a cinema in 1975 and became a bingo hall.

Anyway, Supersonic Saucer seems to have been made on a similar budget as a bus ride to the cinema and the purchase of a matinee ticket might cost. Perhaps a carton of Kia-Ora too to pay the special effects chap. People make a big deal of the premise that Spielberg may have got some of his ideas for ET from the film. In hindsight it seems entirely possible that he could have come up with his child sized alien story quite independently. The two films are not exactly peas in a pod.

It concerns these three kids (Marcia ManolescueGillian Harrison and Fella Edmondswho are left behind at a boarding school, in that mythical England where most CFF adventures take place, to while away their summer holidays. There are two girls and a lad who looks the spit of a young Jacob Rees Mogg and knows a lot about science. They are completely unfazed at finding a little alien in a tree, which they call Meba and take indoors.

Super4

Meba is a bit like a shaved owl wrapped in a white sheet so that only his eyes can be seen, avoiding any need for fancy creature animation. He communicates telepathically, cries a bit, can turn time backwards by rolling those big eyes and has the ability to transform himself into a flying saucer. If the kids wish for something, for example money or cakes, Meba simply flies through the town and nicks them. Of course it’s pointed out that stealing is wrong and Meba pops the cash and cakes back.

A gang of crooks, known only by numbers, are bent on robbing the school, thus  allowing the kids and the alien ample scope to show how stupid adults are. Meba has lots of fun with repeatedly turning time backwards as the hapless baddies try to climb a long staircase. Of course, in the fullness of time, the forces of good prevail and the little chap flies off to his home planet.

The head felon is played with relish by rotund character actor Raymond Rollett. The original story, although it’s no War of the Worlds by any stretch of the imagination, was written by Frank Wells, son of the great science fiction writer H. G. Wells. Frank was a main executive at the CFF.

Watching Supersonic Saucer is great fun, not always for the right reasons I fear. A much better film on a similar theme, also made under the auspices of the CFF, is The Glitterball (1977). It takes place in a recognisable, gritty 70’s England and features cool, stop- frame animation.

Supersonic Saucer (1956) DVDrip.avi_20151113_202323.614

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s